Category: Rescue

Washed Up Macramé Owl Thaws on Shores of Okanagan Lake

A great mystery that appeared on the shores of Okanagan Lake has had the Macramé Owl Sanctuary team stumped.

Our transition of Macramé Owl Sanctuary headquarters to Canada has been fraught with delay and hardship. With lack of funding and suitable accommodation, the Macramé Owls have been living in cramped quarters, doing their best to maintain high spirits. While discussing housing issues, sanctuary volunteer, Darius Prince and I took a long walk along the beach of Okanagan Lake in the British Columbia Rocky Mountain interior.

Darius spotted a mysterious round parcel that had washed up onto the beach. What the heck was it?

Lo and behold, it was labelled “To the Macramé Owl Sanctuary, Canada”. What are the odds?!

There appeared to be a bit of a crack along the side of this chrysalis-like packaging. Coincidentally, we noticed nearby that somebody had left a blanket. Wanting to keep this sad package dry, we gently moved it over onto this blanket. We weren’t quite sure what to do next. As we pondered it, Darius noted a raft of ducks on the lake were slowly approaching us.

Then we noticed something really wierd was happening. Something began to emerge from the packaging!

Slowly slithering, something was creeping out!

On closer examination, Darius identified the tell-tale signs of jute and yarn, which is the typical plumage of the Macramé Owl.

Testing its vital signs, Darius is happy to report, it’s alive!

A strange, heartwrenching note affixed to its tail read: “Please love me, too.”

One of the mallards made it to shore, approaching with a concerned-sounding quack.

We decided we had to get this magnificent specimen away from the wet sand and cold snow to ensure its survival.

Looking a little shell-shocked, we encouraged the Macramé Owl to have a little rest upon a park bench.

A little compassion goes a long way with a Macramé Owl.

We decided he was too weak to remain homeless, so we brought him to the Macramé Owl Sanctuary for further rest and recuperation.

His origin remains a mystery, but our team is working with clues and will update you on his condition when we are able to piece together more information.

© March 2, 2014 | Annie Zalezsak

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Perkins Arrives

Windblown and somewhat discombobulated, Perkins arrived safe and sound at the Macramé Owl Sanctuary today. His journey began before Christmas when he set out from Valleyford, Washington, USA on one way ticket with only a brown paper bag tied in festive string, and a Macramé Showcase magazine to keep him entertained.

Macrame Owl Perkins

The Macramé Owl Sanctuary Team (MOST) were a bit concerned about delays often occurring when travelling during the holiday season. Over the last week, we had been hearing night time owl hoots in the distance, so we did sense that Perkins was near. Last night’s fierce storms across the United Kingdom caused us considerable alarm. Around midday, the rains subsided, and we searched the area for any sightings. It was then that Perkins was spotted. He had become stuck on one of the nearby fences that had been blown about by the 90km winds.

Perkins at the gateWe are pleased to report that Perkins was immediately admitted to the Macramé Owl Sanctuary.

Despite being rather stiff and stunned, we managed to pry him through the gate.

After a soothing cup of tea indoors, clearly still “out of sorts”, Perkins was left to rest comfortably on the sofa.

Perkins resting

Variety
Whimsical Macramé Owl

Admitted
3 January 2012

Initial Assessment and History
Perkins was discovered nearby the Macramé Owl Sanctuary grounds in a confused state due to a severe storm and several days of sleep deprivation. He was prescribed plenty of bed rest, and is expected to recover from his trying trek within several days.

Read more about Perkins.

Macramé Owl Desecration

This is perhaps the most astonishing Macramé Owl survival story we have heard of to date. Have tissues at the ready. This story will move you to tears.

A little over 2 weeks ago, far away in New Zealand, Colleen Millar innocently purchased a doormat. Concerned about the environment, Colleen was delighted when the shop keeper assured her that the mat was made of recycled materials. Rolled up tightly with cotton string, she took the doormat home.

When she unrolled it, some mysterious objects fell out.

She didn’t think much about it at the time. She simply laid the doormat out on her door step.

Colleen is an avid supporter of the Macramé Owl Sanctuary and a frequent visitor to our Facebook page. Upon reading our report about Macramé Owl poaching, she was mortified to learn that Macramé Owls are still be hunted for their jute. When she put two-and-two together, she became considerably alarmed. Were poached Macramé Owl bodies recycled for something as indignant as a doormat?! Desperate for advice, she sent us this picture of her doormat (see below) and expressed her distress at this inconceivable possibility.

Doormat... or is it?

The Macramé Owl Sanctuary Team hears many tragic stories of Macramé Owl neglect. But this story truly hit home. Sadly, we had to inform Colleen that she may have unknowingly been involved in an immoral transaction with this purchase. We advised her to check the mat carefully for any remnants of ceramic eye or beak. Colleen reports:

“It occured to me that I had noticed a feather or two in the house. I just thought they had been blown in by the wind. But suddenly, it just hit me like a ton of bricks. I ran to the door, and Bob, our cat, had already made the gruesome discovery. Bob had somehow flipped the mat over, and was investigating random pieces of Macramé Owl parts!

“I nearly heaved. It was a disgusting sight! Nonetheless, I knew I had to photo-document this so that other innocent shoppers are not deceived; that they will be alerted about what to look for; and that no Macramé Owl is victimized by this insane, inhumane criminality ever again.”

Colleen with doormat made of recycled Macramé Owl

While we may never know what horrors this Macramé Owl has been through, or what he looked like in his former incarnation, there is a happy ending to this atrocity. This doormat landed in the hands of Colleen, a caring Macramé Owl advocate, who just so happens to work as a Sterilization Technician in a medical environment. Colleen explains:

“There are some fine surgeons on our team, so I asked for their advice, and pulled in a few favours,” said Colleen. “It was touch-and-go at times, and I really wasn’t sure Frankie would pull through reconstructive surgery following such a traumatic ordeal. It just goes to show you what immense survival spirit the Macramé Owl species has. We’ll save them from extinction yet!”

Pictured below, a relieved Colleen keeps Frankie warm as he recuperates from surgery at home. How did he get the name Frankie? Colleen reveals:

“Well, obviously, we didn’t know what variety of Macramé Owl he was. Or even if he was a he or a she! So we named ‘him’ Frankie, after Frankenstein. We felt it was appropriate since we rebuilt him from random Macramé Owl parts and gave him life. I admit, he is a bit odd looking, and has a tendency to stare at nothing in particular, but that is typical of most Macramé Owls… isn’t it?”

Frankie and Colleen

Out of all tragedy comes some good. Colleen has since volunteered to campaign for Macramé Owl Anti-Poaching laws to be introduced into New Zealand. She truly exemplifies our motto: WITTOSOMO! (Whatever It Takes To Save Our Macramé Owls!)

Macramé Owl Poaching

Warning: The Contents of this Post May Shock and Disturb You

I recently travelled to Canada to investigate reports that Macramé Owls are still being hunted for their jute. I discovered that Macramé Owl poaching is still rampant in the wilds of the western provinces. The severity of this environmental disrespect is still unknown, but we are making progress in uncovering the secrecy surrounding this despicable — nay, diabolical — behaviour. We need your help to stop this insanity now!

While there, I met an amazing person with an inspiring story of personal transformation. Amith Perera used to be a Macramé Owl Poacher. At one time, he saw this loathsome practice as a masculine, high adrenalin, entertaining sport. But before you judge, read Amith’s story.

Confessions of a Former Macramé Owl Poacher

“I used to be a Macramé Owl poacher myself. Outright, blatant and proud. It was such a rush! Stalking them, trapping them, and then hanging them proudly on my cabin walls.

“One day, I shot a Great Wooden Hoop Macramé Owl. For years, this variety had been my most valuable, highly sought-after kill; my greatest, proudest trophy. But as the gun shot echoed across the valley, something shocked my senses, thrusting me into a different time, shifting my thoughts, feelings, and the direction of my entire life.

“Within the harsh, dead silence that followed, I heard a meek and sombre “whoooo whoooo”. It stopped me in my tracks. As a lone tear escaped down my cheek, I whispered my guilty reply:

“meee… meee…”

“I fell to my knees in remorseful despair. I realized I had shot a mother Macramé Owl, leaving its grieving orphans desperately seeking to understand the blasphemous act that had just taken place.

“I had to rethink my entire life. I had to take full responsibility for my actions. I vowed, there and then, to never, ever harm another Macramé Owl again — not even the pathetic, ugly ones!

“I now devote my life to protecting all Macramé Owls from harm.”

Reformed

Amith now campaigns for Macramé Owl anti-poaching laws to be passed. He not only enforces regulations by bringing Macramé Owl poachers to justice; he also mediates between transgressors and victims to create greater inter-species peace and understanding.

I was so inspired by Amith’s story and resulting compassion for the plight of the Macramé Owl, that I invited him to join the Macramé Owl Sanctuary Team (Canadian Division) as our MOAPER (Macramé Owl Anti-Poaching Enforcement Regulator). He graciously accepted and we welcome his ‘insider’ information to aid our cause in saving many more Macramé Owls from devastation and trauma.

Below:  Macramé Owl Ignatius (‘Iggy’ for short) congratulates Amith in his new role as MOAPER.

Iggy congratulates Amith

How to Identify Macramé Owl Poaching Behaviour

Through photographic re-enactments, Amith, Iggy and other Macramé Owl residents agreed to show our concerned Macramé Owl enthusiasts just what to look out for when identifying a despicable act of Macramé Owl poaching.

No Macramé Owls were harmed during this photo shoot. Any trauma re-lived by Iggy and the others was closely supervised by a professional Macramé Owl psychologist.

The Stalk, Swoop, and Swing Method. Below: Through some lame shrubbery, the poacher stalks the unsuspecting Macramé Owl hanging around in a tree amid an apparently safe locale, minding his own business.

Poacher stalks a Macramé Owl

The poacher swoops in, catching the Macramé Owl by complete surprise.

With absolutely no respect or dignity toward the Macramé Owl, the poacher rudely swings him over his shoulder and ignorantly saunters off with his prey.

The Lie and Leap Method. Below: The poacher patiently lies in waiting for the perfect moment to leap up and pounce on his prize.

As the poacher prepares to leap upward, the Lemon Macramé Owl notices in the nick of time, letting out an ear-piercing screech!

Alerted by the warning, and much to the poacher’s dismay, the Lime Macramé Owl has flown off to another tree for safety. Still, this does not deter the greedy poacher as he continues to leap in the direction of his prey.

Note: The only thing that will scare off a poacher, is if he knows YOU are around as a witness. Don’t be afraid to let him know you disapprove. Macramé Owl poachers are cowards that prey only on the innocent and defenseless. We ask that you bravely intercept a Macramé Owl poacher and stop him from continual victimization of these special creatures. He is sure to depart quickly, and empty-handed.

The Sneak and Snatch Method. Below: Here, the poacher cleverly sneaks up behind the trees where two unsuspecting Macramé Owls are socializing.

This tactic makes it easy for the poacher to snatch the smaller varieties of Macramé Owl.

The Entangle and Entrap Method. Below: This naive Macramé Owl is under the illusion that she is safe within (what she thinks is effective) camouflage.

But the determined Macramé Owl poacher stops at nothing to get what he is after. He uses a clever entanglement technique causing the so-called ‘safe camouflage’ environment to entrap the Macramé Owl. Despite a defiant struggle, the Macramé Owl is helplessly caught in the branches… and swiftly winds up in the evil arms of the poacher.

It cannot be said enough:

Clever Macramé Owl Rescue

Albino Macrame Owls from window

From an upstairs window of her home, Loraine Gliser of Holts Summit, Missouri in the USA, spotted two rather large Albino Macramé Owls taking refuge in a tree in her back garden. With a mixture of alarm and excitement, she carefully ventured near and attempted to coax them down. But they must have been through quite an ordeal as they seemed to be paralyzed by fear and would not budge. She tried to subliminally mesmerize them, yet they remained motionless.

Loraine Gliser attempting to mesmerize the Macrame Owls

They stayed in the tree for quite some time.

Albino Macrame Owls in the tree

After several phone calls to husband Mike Gliser, he was able to rush home to aid Loraine in the rescue. Fortunately, Mike had read up on Macramé handling techniques in the past. Now was his chance to put this knowledge into practice. However, his first attempt received some resistance.

Mike Gliser attempting to rescue Albino Macrame Owls

It was then that the couple realized this pair would need greater persuasion. But what would entice them? Knowing that some species are drawn to shiny objects, Loraine had an idea. Fetching a gleaming green ribbon bow, she flashed it in the direction of the Macramé Owls. Then, holding it behind her back, she pretended to walk away, nonchalantly. Just look how the one on the left is relentlessly staring after her!

Loraine Gliser tempting Albino Macrame Owls with a shiny green bow behind her back!

Well, this worked! Soon, the pair were making themselves very comfortable indoors!

Albino Macramé Owl pair with a shiny green bow

Macramé Owl Travesty

A horrific and shocking story was relayed to me by a woman in the UK. It seems a colleague of hers, Guy Fryer, was recently in Europe. While taking some time out in Poland, he had a dreadful encounter.

Guy reports:

“Six of us decided to go and spend a few nights away from it all in the mountains in a log cabin. When we arrived, it had no water, electricity or anything, but a stream. It had an outside toilet which was a wooden hut with a hole in the floor. I won’t go into detail… see the picture below.”

Photo credit: Guy Fryer, log cabin in Poland

Guy continues:

“Inside (remember it’s a hunter’s cabin) it was full of bones, jaws, skulls, and live rodents which you had to protect yourself against when you slept in your sleeping bag… but my horror was complete when I saw this!!”

 Photo credit: Guy Fryer, Macrame Owl travesty in Poland

Guy confirms to us that:

“This is a 100% true story!!!”

We believe you 100%, Guy. Tragic stories like this are (sadly) not unknown to us. Guy was unfortunately unable to save this Macramé Owl. He did not have the expertise of a trained MOWRON (Macramé Owl Welfare Rescue Operations Nurse). Due to lack of funding, we were unable to dispatch our team on a mission to retrieve this Macramé Owl from its degrading environment.

This Macramé Owl may never know true happiness and freedom, but there are others out there in equally dire circumstances. They need your help. If this story tugs at your heart strings, and you want to know how you can do your part in saving the Macramé Owl, please visit our Volunteer page on our website and/or consider making a donation to aid our efforts and support our Macramé Owl Sanctuary.

We also aim to provide counselling for people like Guy who may suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a result of such a horrendous experience.

Rita’s Rescue

Rita the Brush-tailed Basketcase Macrame Owl's Rescue

Variety
Brush-tailed Basketcase Macramé Owl

Admitted
31 August 2010

Initial Assessment and History
Rita was noticed sporadically over a period of almost two years, particularly around the springtime breeding season. She was quite timid and protective of what was thought to be her nest in a plant pot outside an old building in Cardiff. Over time, she appeared to grow weak. We maintained close observation, left food for her, and eventually she became more comfortable around people. Eventually, she realized she needed the support of our team, and decided to voluntarily enter the sanctuary. Her young had long since fledged. She later confessed she had been suffering from empty nest syndrome, and is now content to have found a new family among the other Macramé Owls.

Read more about Rita.