Macramé Owl Desecration

This is perhaps the most astonishing Macramé Owl survival story we have heard of to date. Have tissues at the ready. This story will move you to tears.

A little over 2 weeks ago, far away in New Zealand, Colleen Millar innocently purchased a doormat. Concerned about the environment, Colleen was delighted when the shop keeper assured her that the mat was made of recycled materials. Rolled up tightly with cotton string, she took the doormat home.

When she unrolled it, some mysterious objects fell out.

She didn’t think much about it at the time. She simply laid the doormat out on her door step.

Colleen is an avid supporter of the Macramé Owl Sanctuary and a frequent visitor to our Facebook page. Upon reading our report about Macramé Owl poaching, she was mortified to learn that Macramé Owls are still be hunted for their jute. When she put two-and-two together, she became considerably alarmed. Were poached Macramé Owl bodies recycled for something as indignant as a doormat?! Desperate for advice, she sent us this picture of her doormat (see below) and expressed her distress at this inconceivable possibility.

Doormat... or is it?

The Macramé Owl Sanctuary Team hears many tragic stories of Macramé Owl neglect. But this story truly hit home. Sadly, we had to inform Colleen that she may have unknowingly been involved in an immoral transaction with this purchase. We advised her to check the mat carefully for any remnants of ceramic eye or beak. Colleen reports:

“It occured to me that I had noticed a feather or two in the house. I just thought they had been blown in by the wind. But suddenly, it just hit me like a ton of bricks. I ran to the door, and Bob, our cat, had already made the gruesome discovery. Bob had somehow flipped the mat over, and was investigating random pieces of Macramé Owl parts!

“I nearly heaved. It was a disgusting sight! Nonetheless, I knew I had to photo-document this so that other innocent shoppers are not deceived; that they will be alerted about what to look for; and that no Macramé Owl is victimized by this insane, inhumane criminality ever again.”

Colleen with doormat made of recycled Macramé Owl

While we may never know what horrors this Macramé Owl has been through, or what he looked like in his former incarnation, there is a happy ending to this atrocity. This doormat landed in the hands of Colleen, a caring Macramé Owl advocate, who just so happens to work as a Sterilization Technician in a medical environment. Colleen explains:

“There are some fine surgeons on our team, so I asked for their advice, and pulled in a few favours,” said Colleen. “It was touch-and-go at times, and I really wasn’t sure Frankie would pull through reconstructive surgery following such a traumatic ordeal. It just goes to show you what immense survival spirit the Macramé Owl species has. We’ll save them from extinction yet!”

Pictured below, a relieved Colleen keeps Frankie warm as he recuperates from surgery at home. How did he get the name Frankie? Colleen reveals:

“Well, obviously, we didn’t know what variety of Macramé Owl he was. Or even if he was a he or a she! So we named ‘him’ Frankie, after Frankenstein. We felt it was appropriate since we rebuilt him from random Macramé Owl parts and gave him life. I admit, he is a bit odd looking, and has a tendency to stare at nothing in particular, but that is typical of most Macramé Owls… isn’t it?”

Frankie and Colleen

Out of all tragedy comes some good. Colleen has since volunteered to campaign for Macramé Owl Anti-Poaching laws to be introduced into New Zealand. She truly exemplifies our motto: WITTOSOMO! (Whatever It Takes To Save Our Macramé Owls!)

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